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Mourning. Comfort. Really?

Blessed are those who mourn,

for they shall be comforted.

— Christ Jesus, Matthew 5:4

Have you found this to be True or False in your life?

As always, I’d love to hear from you, any of the the usual ways.

 

A Troublesome Bible Passage

I’m not making this up. This is Romans 13:1-7 in the New International Bible —

Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God.

Consequently, whoever rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and those who do so will bring judgment on themselves. For rulers hold no terror for those who do right, but for those who do wrong.

Do you want to be free from fear of the one in authority? Then do what is right and you will be commended. For the one in authority is God’s servant for your good.

But if you do wrong, be afraid, for rulers do not bear the sword for no reason. They are God’s servants, agents of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer.

Therefore, it is necessary to submit to the authorities, not only because of possible punishment but also as a matter of conscience.

This is also why you pay taxes, for the authorities are God’s servants, who give their full time to governing.

Give to everyone what you owe them: If you owe taxes, pay taxes; if revenue, then revenue; if respect, then respect; if honor, then honor.

— Verses like these above have been used to commit atrocities. One glaring example was in Europe in the 1930s and 40s.

A Roman Catholic colleague told me when I was fresh out of seminary, “Be careful when you say, ‘My country, right or wrong’ because that’s kind of like saying, ‘My mother, drunk or sober.'”

What do you say?

“Now is The Moment.”

With gratitude to friend and colleague Mark Doane (who by the way sings and plays lead guitar in The Rivers of Life Clergy Band; have you booked us yet to come play your event? Let’s chat.)Image may contain: text

It’s a Monday: I Stopped

“I stopped trying to be cool in 1987.”

— Rob Lowe

Is Hebrews 10:25 a Weapon?

Forsake not the assembling of yourselves together is how Hebews 10:25 starts.

I’ve heard it referenced a lot over the last several months.

Usually it’s being ripped out of context to become a weapon.

Sometimes it’s used against various Health Department guidelines.

Often it becomes a way to try to bring shame to other Christians.

Let me suggest that we would all do well to step back and read that phrase in its context.

One Question

Go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you.— Christ Jesus, Matthew 28:19

How ya coming along with that lately?

 

How Long? Really?

Ed Friedman is part of a study group called Daf Yomi.

Daf Yomi is Hebrew, and comes to English as “page of the day” because every day the members systematically study one of the pages of the Talmud.

The Talmud is the record of rabbinc discussions of Jewish law.

It’s 2,711 pages long.

The Daf Yomi cycle is a seven and half years long.

What do they do when they get to the end?

Start all over again.

“Every night I can’t wait to learn what the Talmud will say,” enthuses Mr. Freidman.

*cough, cough* Kinda makes our whining about reading like a chapter a day in our Bibles look rather…uhm…I’ll let you finish that sentence.

 

 

Hunter S. Thompson & G. K. Chesterton & Christ Jesus

[QUICK REVIEW: “Buy the ticket, take the ride.” So wrote Hunter S. Thompson in his book, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

Seems to me that for too many of us Christianity has become a spectator sport. Some of us are in the bleachers arguing over the last play, or screaming for a new coach, or complaining about the other team having a deeper bench. Others of us are up in a party room sky box, gorging on food and drink, laughing with friends, maybe occasionally even glancing at the action on the field. Others of us are still in the parking lot. Tailgating the entire time seems easier and cheaper.

G. K. Chesterton wrote, “Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.”]

Follow me, says Christ Jesus in Matthew 8:22.

Come to me, says Christ Jesus in Matthew 11:28.

Walk with me, says Christ Jesus in Matthew 11:29.

Mrs. Merry taught us about Active Verbs in 3rd grade.

Our Lord uses those kind of verbs as invitations to us.

I’m still learning what that means.

You, too?

Hunter S. Thompson & G. K. Chesterton

[QUICK REVIEW: “Buy the ticket, take the ride.” So wrote Hunter S. Thompson in his book, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Seems to me that for too many of us Christianity has become a spectator sport.]

Some of us are in the bleachers arguing over the last play, or screaming for a new coach, or complaining about the other team having a deeper bench.

Others of us are up in a party room sky box, gorging on food and drink, laughing with friends, maybe occasionally even glancing at the action on the field.

Others of us are still in the parking lot. Tailgating the entire time seems easier and cheaper.

“Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.” G. K. Chesterton wrote that.

 

 

Hunter S. Thompson

“Buy the ticket, take the ride.”

So wrote Hunter S. Thompson in his book, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

Seems to me that for too many of us Christianity has become a spectator sport.