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Every Child Is

“Every child is an artist.

The problem is

how to remain an artist

once we grow up.”

— Pablo Picasso

 

[Let’s spend the month of August 2018 looking at some quotes, lines, memes, and other timeless ephemera — how’s that for an oxymoron? — that are too good not to share. Let’s contextualize some, let’s dissect others, and let’s simply enjoy still others. Let’s go!]

 

“Every child is an artist.

The problem is

how to remain an artist

once we grow up.”

— Pablo Picasso

 

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Not Your Solitary Life

“I don’t need a church because

I study the Bible for myself.”

 

“That’s proof that you don’t actually

study the Bible for yourself.”

 

[Let’s spend the month of August 2018 looking at some quotes, lines, memes, and other timeless ephemera — how’s that for an oxymoron? — that are too good not to share. Let’s contextualize some, let’s dissect others, and let’s simply enjoy still others. Let’s go!]

Somewhere on the long and winding road (hello, Beatles fans) I learned that the church is the only organization that exists for people outside of itself.

And somewhere along that same path you and I have sometimes forgotten that.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer wrote from his Nazi prison cell to his friend Eberhard Bethge on April 30, 1944, “God’s “beyond” is not the beyond of our cognitive faculties.  God is beyond in the midst of our life. The church stands, not at the boundaries where human powers give out, but in the middle of the village.”

He also noted that “Jesus is there only for others.” Faith is participation in us also being “there only for others.”

In some notes he left behind when he was hanged in that Flossenberg prison camp, Bonhoeffer clearly says that “Jesus is the man for others.”

Furthermore, he wrote that “The church is the church only when it exists for others. The church must share in the secular problems of ordinary human life, not dominating, but helping and serving. It must tell people of every calling, what it means to live in Christ, what it means to to exist for others.”

 

“I don’t need a church because

I study the Bible for myself.”

 

“That’s proof that you don’t actually

study the Bible for yourself.”

Sabbath. Simple, Right? part 4.

Quick Review:

How are you observing Sabbath lately?

Jesus observed the Sabbath, according to Luke 4:16 — He came to Nazareth where he had been raised. As he always did on the Sabbath, he went to synagogue. 

Jesus said that keeping Sabbath was not a duty that people owed to God. He spun it around and taught that God made the Sabbath as a day of rest for humanity’s benefit — The Sabbath was made to serve us; we weren’t made to serve the Sabbath. (Mark 2:27)

Jesus and those closest to him didn’t exactly follow the strict Jewish rules about not doing any work on the Sabbath. For example, pick one or more of the following: Matthew 12:1-14Mark 2:23-283:1-6Luke 6:1-1113:10-1714:1-6John 5:1-18.

Today:

Many secular sources cite the need for Sabbath, naming it a time of regular rest.

But it all seems to have begun as part of the Ten Commandments, like this: Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a sabbath of the LORD your God; in it you shall not do any work, you or your son or your daughter, your male or your female servant or your cattle or your sojourner who stays with you. For in six days the LORD made the heavens and the earth, the sea and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day; therefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day and made it holy. (Exodus 20:8-11) Sounds here like it’s about remembering Who’s in charge, and following God’s example of taking time to rest (Genesis 2:2).

Sabbath. Simple, right?

As we live into all this and continue to work out (our) own salvation with fear and trembling, as Philippians 2:12 says, let’s remember above all else the words of the Source (Exodus 20:8-11) and let’s keep it holy.  

Need a Nap?

[Let’s spend the month of August 2018 looking at some quotes, lines, memes, and other timeless ephemera — how’s that for an oxymoron? — that are too good not to share. Let’s contextualize some, let’s dissect others, and let’s simply enjoy still others. Let’s go — ]

Daniel slept in a lions den.

Peter slept in a prison.

Jesus slept in a storm.

No matter your circumstance,

you can take a nap.

If You Never Heal from What Hurt You

If you never heal from what hurt you,

you’ll bleed on people who didn’t cut you.

 

[Let’s spend the month of August 2018 looking at some timeless ephemera — how’s that for an oxymoron? — that are too good not to share.

Let’s contextualize some, let’s dissect others, and let’s simply learn from still others.

Let’s go.]

 

If you never heal from what hurt you,

you’ll bleed on people who didn’t cut you.

BONUS BLOG: encouragement, and from a bishop

Bishop Ken Carter serves our denomination, and serves quite well. Here is one example, in the form of something he wrote very recently (I’ll bet we come back to it sometime, don’t you?) —

I feel led to say this.

I am often in conversations–some with more traditionalist friends, some with more progressive friends, some with people who find themselves in the middle. They are at times mischaracterized or misjudged by people who don’t know them, don’t know their hearts, don’t know their sacrifices. They feel labeled or put in a box.

I am always blessed to be in these conversations. And if I could encourage this messy, imperfect church that I love in some way, it would be to say this.
Let’s lay aside the litmus tests for a season, from every side. Let’s be quick to listen, slow to speak, slow to anger (James 1). Let’s look for the best in each other. Where possible, let’s start over.

Amazingly, this is what Jesus does for us, through the cross. We all stand under that cross. We all kneel at the foot of that cross. We all find our ultimate identity–and this is pure gift–in that cross.

God Went to All the Trouble

God pursues us in our restlessness,

recieves us in our sinfulness,

and holds us in our brokenness.

— Scotty Smith

 “This is how much God loved the world,” says John 3:16, going on to say, “God gave his Son, his one and only Son. And this is why: so that no one need be destroyed; by believing in him, anyone can have a whole and lasting life.”

[Let’s spend the month of August 2018 looking at some quotes, lines, memes, and other timeless ephemera — how’s that for an oxymoron? — that are too good not to share. Let’s contextualize some, let’s dissect others, and let’s simply enjoy still others. Let’s go!]

And then comes this very next verse in John 3: “God didn’t go to all the trouble of sending his Son merely to point an accusing finger, telling the world how bad it was. He came to help, to put the world right again.”

God pursues us in our restlessness,

recieves us in our sinfulness,

and holds us in our brokenness.

— Scotty Smith